Students, the reason why we come in every day, are the primary target for a flipped classroom's success. While a flipped classroom can allow a teacher to more efficiently use their time, the flipped environment is entirely dependent on enhancing the students' learning in your class. The following topics need to be executed before the students walk into their first day in the flipped classroom.

Expectations

Students need to know that they are in charge of their learning at home. Homework needs to be completed every day it is assigned to ensure students can come to class with the needed knowledge. Without completing the homework, the student will be lost in class.

Your students need to realize the importance of being responsible in this class. For some, it may be the first time they are given full control over their learning(for younger ages, or for students who have never experienced aspects of a flipped classroom). For others, it may come naturally.

The key to keeping students from avoiding homework is to keep videos and homework under 20 minutes. When this is done, students can take a small portion of their day after school to watch said videos, as opposed to doing hours of work for multiple classes.

 

Safety Net

When students experience change, it is important to not only provide a steady and reliable transition, but also to provide a safety net for students who do not adapt well to intense changes. Often, teachers will provide additional resources, after-school help, and/or a pool of resources from which students can learn. This is also a great way to differentiate your teaching to an additional degree and provide students with many different ways to absorb the knowledge you are providing.

 

Be Upfront About Grading

Often in a flipped classroom, grading is tricky. When homework involves watching a video, grades cannot be given based on a trust system. Instead, it is important to provide rubrics and other details of how students' assignments will be graded so those students may adjust their habits in the classroom. This is especially important when it comes to major projects that represent a major part of their grade.

 

Give Them a Sense of Control and Ownership

When managing your class, you are in control. However, asking students for advice, feedback, criticism and the ability to be honest with your approach will go a long way. Not only will this give you valuable information for improvement and adjustment, but it will also give the students a sense of control in their lives. If they can honestly say that a homework video was not clear, they are investing time and effort into improving their own education. When you receive this feedback, be sure to react to it so students can see the change.

 

Develop a Consistent Model

Once again, change is a scary thing for students. Once you find your style and presence, try to keep everything as consisten as you can. Students will embrace patterns and deliver results if they are certain the expectations are without major change. When changing styles or methods of instructional delivery, make students aware, explain the reasons, and show them why the change is an improvement.

 

Some Students Won't Do Homework. Have a Plan for Them

Whether it be financial or motivation reasons, some students won't do homework. It is up to you to decide how to handle this. Often, for financial reasons, such as not being able to afford internet or a device(given your school is not providing them), you may need to find creative ways to provide resources for students. Some solutions involve providing DVDs with material from the entire course, researching availability of internet at libraries or community centers, being available for multiple days per week after school, or finding a way to provide alternate materials.

If the problem comes from motivation, teachers will sometimes not allow students to participate in engaging, fun activites until the homework has been completed. In this scenario, it is important to ensure the students have a dedicated area to focus on the homework assignment. See Effective Classroom Layouts.